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Disassembly Motorola XOOM and Repair it .

Motorola XOOM: Front

The Motorola XOOM has a 10.1-inch WXGA display that supports a 1280 x 800 resolution. On the front of the device, you'll find the 2MP Webcam, Webcam indicator LED, notification LED, and charging LED.


Motorola XOOM: SIM card and microSD card slots

The Motorola XOOM has a single opening for the device's microSD card and SIM card slots. Both slots are filled with dummy cards made of clear plastic. According to Motorola documentation, neither can currently be used. The SIM slot will be used once the device is upgraded to LTE 4G and the microSD slot will be activated with a future software update.


Motorola XOOM: Removing the external case screws

The first step in opening the Motorola XOOM is removing the two Torx T5 screws located along the bottom edge. Luckily Motorola didn't use any security screws--like the annoying pentalobe screws Apple is using on several devices.


With the two external case screws removed, you can slide the back cover down about two inches. Internal catches prevent the cover from sliding completely off.

Motorola XOOM: Releasing the back cover catches

Using a plastic spudger or thin metal blade, you can release the internal catches the prevent the back cover from sliding all the way off.


Motorola XOOM: Back cover removed

Once the internal catches are released, you can slide the back cover away from the Motorola XOOM internal frame.


Motorola XOOM: First look inside

With the back cover removed, we get our first look inside the Motorola XOOM. We can already see the large battery and part of the main PCB.


Motorola XOOM: Removing the speaker and rear-facing camera cover

With the back, metal cover removed, we'll turn our attention to the plastic cover that protects the rear-facing camera, speakers, flash, and power/lock button. Two Torx screws hold this plastic strip in place.


Motorola XOOM: Volume up and down buttons ribbon cable

Even with its two screws removed, you can't lift the plastic cover away from the Motorola XOOM's internal frame just yet. A thin ribbon cable for the volume up and down buttons (right side) still connects the cover to the main PCB.



Motorola XOOM: Disconnecting the volume buttons' ribbon cable

Using a plastic spudger, I disconnected the volume buttons' ribbon cable from Motorola XOOM's the main PCB.

Motorola XOOM: Thin plastic cover removed

With the thin plastic cover removed, the Motorola XOOM's main PCB is completely exposed.


Motorola XOOM: Back covers completely removed

As with the Apple iPad, Dell Streak, and Samsung Galaxy tab, the Motorola XOOM's battery takes up much of the space inside the case. We'll start our internal dissection by removing the battery.


Motorola XOOM: Removing the battery screws

The battery is held to the Motorola XOOM's internal frame with 12 Torx T6 screws.


Motorola XOOM: Removing the battery connector screws

There are another two Torx T5 screws holding the battery connector to the main PCB.


Motorola XOOM: Disconnecting the small battery connector

Before removing the Motorola XOOM's battery, you'll also need to detach this tiny connector, which is attached to a pair of very thin red and black wires.


Motorola XOOM: Remvoing the battery

With all the screws removed and the connectors detached, you can lift the Motorola XOOM's battery away from the internal frame.



Motorola XOOM: 7.4V 24.1 Wh Li-ion battery

The Motorola XOOM has a 7.4V 3250 mAh 24.1 Wh Li-ion battery.

Motorola XOOM: Battery - back

 

Motorola XOOM: With the battery removed

With the battery removed, we'll turn our attached to a small card witout any chips. This appears to a placeholder card for the LTE 4G upgrade that Verizon is promising for the Motorola XOOM.


Motorola XOOM: Removing the LTE 4G placeholder card screws

The LTE 4G placeholder card is held in place with a pair of Torx T5 screws. two antenna wires are also connected to the card.


  
Motorola XOOM: Removing the LTE 4G placeholder card

With the screws removed and the wires disconnected, you can lift the placeholder card away from the metal frame.

Motorola XOOM: LTE 4G placeholder card removed 

Motorola XOOM: LTE 4G placeholder card - Top

 

Motorola XOOM: Disconnecting the 5MP rear-facing camera

We'll turn our attention to the cameras next. First, we'll remove the rear-facing 5MP camera. It is connected to the Motorola XOOM's main PCB via a black plastic spacer and very thin ribbon cable.


Motorola XOOM: 5MP rear-facing camera removed 

Motorola XOOM: 2MP Front-facing Webcam removed

Motorola XOOM: Left-side external speaker

Next, we'll remove the Motorola XOOM's external speakers. Each speaker is connected to the main PCB with a small, black connector.

Motorola XOOM: Removing the left-side internal speaker

With the speaker's connector detached, you can lift the speaker away from the Motorola XOOM's metal frame.


Motorola XOOM: Motorola XOOM: Left-side internal speaker removed

A thin adhesive film holds the speaker to the frame, but you sould be able to remove the speaker without completely removing the film.


Motorola XOOM: Removing the right-side external speaker

To remove the Motorola XOOM's right-side speaker, use the the same process as on the left.


 

Motorola XOOM: Right-side external speaker removed

 

Motorola XOOM: Antenna wires

Before we can remove the Motorola XOOM's main PCB, we'll need to disconnect the antenna wires that run allong the top edge.

Motorola XOOM: Antenna wires disconnected

The Motorola XOOM's antenna wires are held to the main PCB with metal clips. You can easily pull the wires out of the clips and away from the circuit boad. The wires will remain soldered to a contact plate attached to touchscreen's bezel.


Motorola XOOM: Removing the main PCB screws

With the placeholder LTE 4G card, speakers, and antenna wires, removed, we can begin removing the screws that hold the Motorola XOOM's main PCB in place.


Motorola XOOM: Detaching the ribbon cables from the main PCB

After removing all the main PCB's screws. You'll also need to detach several cables.


Motorola XOOM: Detaching the display cable from the main PCB

You'll also need to detach larger cables, such as this one for the Motorola XOOM's display.


Motorola XOOM: Removing the main PCB

With all the screws and cables removed, you can lift the Motorola XOOM's main PCB away from the internal metal frame.



Motorola XOOM: Display assembly and internal frame

More than a dozen screws and adhesive hold the Motorola XOOM's front panel to the metal frame and display. As you can see the touchscreen's controller chips without removing it from the display assembly, I decided to leave it in place. I want to put this unit back together in complete working order.


Motorola XOOM (Verizon) Teardown

by Bill Detwiler  |  February 26, 2011, 7:47pm PST  |  Image 61 of 64
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Motorola XOOM: Atmel touchscreen controller chips

The Motorola XOOM's touchscreen uses an Atmel mXT1386 controller with markings MXT1386X ES-U 1035I TH 0P2110.


Motorola XOOM: Main PCB - Front

Looking at the top of the Motorola XOOM's main PCB we can't see any of the chips. They're all hidden beneath metal shields, and unfortunately the shields are soldered to the PCB. As I want to reassemble with XOOM in working order, I'm not going to risk damaging the chips or their contacts by cutting the shields loose.
Luckly, our friends over at iFixit did go through the painstaking process of removing the shields. So, we know that hidden under the shields are an Nvidia Tegra T2 dual-core CPU, Broadcom AGPS, Broadcom Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.1, and FM Tuner, Qualcomm HSPA+ chip and Samsung DRAM module.


Motorola XOOM: Main PCB - Back

Just like the shields on the front of the main PCB, those on the back are soldered in place. Again, iFixit comes to the recue. Under these shields, there are chips from Qualcomm, Atmel, Toshiba, and ST Ericsson.


Motorola XOOM: Disassembled

Overall the Motorola XOOM was very easy to disassemble. It has standard Torx T6 and T5 screws. The XOOM also feels like a sturdy and well constructed tablet. And, it should be for $800. Unfortunately, it's unlikely that you'll be able to get spare parts for XOOM anytime soon.
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